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Thread: Studying tips?

  1. #1
    Azureth is offline Banned
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    Studying tips?

    So, I've got some great news! Today as my friend and I were driving back home, I saw a sign that they are building a community college for where I live so it will be very easy for me to get to. And it will be finished by the end of this year! I talked to my gf about it and she said she'd go to the same school! I'm really excited!

    As you know I am wanting to get into Accounting but of course have to get the other mandatory stuff out of the way but haven't done any studying since I was in HS. Any tips? Thanks!

  2. #2
    SheLikesKitties's Avatar
    SheLikesKitties is offline OW/YM 21YR GAP
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    Is this college operating somewhere else at the moment?
    I think that your best bet would be to practice with online excercises.
    You know it's love when the pain of being apart is greater than the pain of being together.

  3. #3
    Azureth is offline Banned
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    Well, there are 4 campuses in Tulsa.

  4. #4
    SheLikesKitties's Avatar
    SheLikesKitties is offline OW/YM 21YR GAP
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    What are you more concerned about? Not passing a test or having lost the discipline required for student life?
    In my particular case, I would be more concerned about the discipline than the academic skills. That is why I have not even tried getting a masters degree. In your case you are still young and you will have the added incentive of having your gf attend the same school, you can motivate each other.
    You know it's love when the pain of being apart is greater than the pain of being together.

  5. #5
    chi77 Guest
    If you can, get yourself a desk and always study there. Study in 90 minute blocks of time...set the timer and do nothing else until that timer goes off. Don't have the tv on or your cell phone.

    Read the chapter BEFORE the lecture. This way you will be able to ask pertinent questions, will be more interested in the lecture, and will have a clue what the lecture is about. Even if your prof doesn't tell you to read, do it. They don't hold your hand like in high school. Don't get behind in the reading or you will probably stop doing it. It's even more boring when it's no longer relevant.

    When you are reading a chapter, skim it first. Look at the titles and the questions at the end. After you've read the chapter, WRITE or type the answers to the questions at the end of the chapter.

    Take notes during the lecture leaving a column about 3 1/2" wide on the right hand side of the paper. As soon as you can afterwards, go through your notes and make sense of them, jotting important ideas or whatever comes to mind in that empty column. If you wait until the next day you will have forgotten things.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    gorillagirl Guest
    study tip:
    start now. get off the computer and start reading long, non-fiction books to build stamina for academic reading. SERIOUSLY.
    i agree completely with Chi77's strategies for reading/note taking. Read the questions at the end of each chapter first to set a course for reading/comprehension. Answer those questions in writing/typing. Read outloud if you have to. Cornell notes (what she described, I think) are excellent note-taking strategies. Google that. But mostly, get the hell out of video-game land and into the library. It's all about books in college. If you are taking your academic life seriously, you will have very little time for TV, internet, caring about other people's drama, video gaming,etc.. It's all about focus/motivation. So wean yourself off all your bad habits now until you can enroll for classes in the spring/summer next year. Be determined to reduce your on-line time for books. SELF STUDY something you like now that requires note-taking and practice. For example, get a book on, say, the history of the Vietnam War and pretend you're in college. Read, take notes, learn the material. Etc... Remember, that community college is not university. It's tougher than high school but it's not Ivy League so don't stress out. Anyone with smarts and motivation can get through community college. It's very likely you will need to take community college entrance exams in English and Math anyway for placement so brush up on your Algebra/Geometry and build your academic vocabulary. Call the counselors at the Tulsa locations and ask what testing is required and see if they recommend any web sites or test-prep books. You are probably eligible for some modifications/accommodations due to your physical disability (such as note-takers or recording lectures). Find out from Tulsa.

    Bottom line: START NOW because once school starts, it will be too late to strengthen your academic skills without the pressure of assignments and tests. Also, semester one, take 6-8 units, not 12-16 units. Give yourself a semester to ramp up.
    Last edited by gorillagirl; 07-18-2013 at 11:32 AM.

  7. #7
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    pinkunicorn is offline Senior Member
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    Let's see, I took a 2 year break between high school and college. Then I took a 10 year break between college and grad school. I know it can be difficult to get back into the swing of things when you've been out for so long! My college was brick-and-mortar (meaning I went to class in the building, had a class schedule, etc). My grad school is online.

    I can tell you from experience that reading NOW to build up your reading muscle for when school starts may sound good in theory, but in real life, it doesn't help. I am a huge bookworm. I got through the Shades of Grey trilogy in two days, and that's with working 8 hours a day, spending time with kids, riding Harley, etc. I can blow through an entire Stephen King novel on a Sunday. Before starting grad school, I read various books on psychology, sociology, family systems, etc. NOTHING prepared me to read the way I needed to read for class! But I think that's a personal thing. When I'm reading just to read, even non-fiction books, I don't feel the need to remember every little detail. I just remember the gist of it and that's all that matters. But when I'm reading in an academic setting, I get nervous about what is important (that will be covered on the test) versus just reading and soaking it in.

    From my experience, online is harder than brick-and-mortar! I don't get the benefit of the class discussions and lectures, so it's a lot of reading. In college, I hardly cracked a book. I got everything I needed from lectures. But then, I am very smart, so not cracking a book may not be the best advice for everyone!

    How fast and how well can you write? Note taking during lectures is intense. I would suggest that you contact the advisor that your school will assign to you and ask him/her to set you up with a note-taker. This person will basically take notes for you in class on special paper that the school will supply. This way he/she can give you a copy of the notes after every lecture. I did this for a guy in my advertising class, and it wasn't any extra work for me, really. I just had to make sure I wrote a little neater than usual.

    Another thing I would suggest is to get to know your professors and make sure they get to know (and like) you. This way, you become more human to them, rather than a name on their class roster. See them during their office hours and ask questions about class, or ask them for feedback on how you are doing in class. This shows the instructors that you care about this class and doing well is important to you.

    Also, don't be afraid to speak up during class. Discussion is great! And sometimes instructors have been in academia for too long and forget that some academic theories just don't apply in real life. If you notice a discrepancy, speak up! In my business management class, I remember my professor stating that secretaries are just wasted overhead costs and are never really needed. Well, I know that's bull! So I spoke up. I mentioned all the small yet necessary tasks that secretaries do, such as payables and receivables, answering the phone and screening calls, filling out and filing paperwork, etc. I said, "So if you are a top-level executive and your time is worth $100 an hour, wouldn't you have more important things to do than sort mail, answer the phone for menial questions such as 'how late are you open?', and file your paperwork when you could pay someone $10 an hour to do it? Why would you waste dollar time on penny jobs? A good, organized secretary is worth her weight in gold!" And this began a great class discussion. Of course, there are some professors you may not be able to do this with. I've had a few who wouldn't hear another viewpoint other than their own.

    Which brings me to another point, get to know your fellow students and talk to them about who is a good professor, who is not so good, and who you should DEFINITELY stay away from! Not all professors are equal.

    I'm so glad you are going back to school, Azureth! Good luck!
    Never try to fit in when you are meant to stand out.


  8. #8
    theREALTrish's Avatar
    theREALTrish is offline Senior Member
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    This isn't a study tip but it's definitely related to going back to school (I went back when I was 40). Go online and fill out the FAFSA forms. They are the forms for federal
    student aide. You will probably qualify for the Pell Grant. You'll indicate the school where you want your information sent and the school will then create a financial aid package
    for you. That will include the federal grant, state grants, grants/scholarships from the school, and possible student loans. Use as much grant money as possible because that
    doesn't have to be paid back. Try to avoid loans, if possible. The interest rate for new student loans just doubled. It's still fairly low but over 2 to 4 years of school, the loans
    add up. I know because I had/have them and now my daughter has them.

    Here's the link for the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aide)....
    Home - FAFSA on the Web-Federal Student Aid

    The financial aid department at your school will be a great help, and there are lots of resources for returning students. Make use of them. Going back to school was the best
    thing I ever did for myself.

    Good luck! You'll do great!
    pinkunicorn and gorillagirl like this.

  9. #9
    pinkunicorn's Avatar
    pinkunicorn is offline Senior Member
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    FAFSA! How did I forget about that! LOL

    Also, talk to the financial aid department and see what kind of scholarships you might apply for. Some are needs based, others are merit based, and there are lots of scholarships out there that are just general. Many companies offer scholarships for people with disabilities--make those hands pay for themselves!
    Never try to fit in when you are meant to stand out.


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