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Thread: Corporate or Non-Profit

  1. #16
    chi77 Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by MissMuffins View Post
    You could SO totally do that! CSA (community supported agriculture), community gardens, urban gardening and heritage gardens are h-o-t right now. Grantors love to fund those projects for many, many reasons and gardening is healthy in so many ways. Anything "intergenerational" especially gardening and dining together is in the spotlight, as well as teaching cooking classes to people who participate in the SNAP program (a.k.a. receive food stamps) and don't know how to cook from scratch.

    If you're looking for one, a good way to get your toes wet would be to volunteer with a food bank, meal site, WIC office, or 4H program. They all keep records, they all handle food, they all teach nutrition and food safety, and they have very different perspectives.

    I'm sure you're aware that there are restaurants successfully doing what you dream of doing; they'd be great resources for successful non-profit business models. By "success" I don't mean making money hand over fist. I mean they support themselves and grow their programs at a sustainable rate--serve more food, teach more people about healthy eating, prepare more people for the workforce, provide more opportunities for the community.

    MM
    I'm a certified Raw Chef, so I can teach basic Raw Chef classes as well. Only problem is of course all of those kinds of ingredients are expensive. Can probably buy 20 lbs of those orange crunchy cheese puffs for the price of one pound of raw, organic nuts or seeds. It would be great to educate those less fortunate, who are also suffering from obesity, hypertension, etc. etc. partially due to the unavailability of fresh produce and lack of knowledge about what real food is (unfortunately that's not just true with the underprivileged). One pound of organic broccoli seeds is about $18.00 last time I checked, but you get a lot of broccoli sprouts out of that. Alfalfa seeds are cheaper and alfalfa sprouts are so nutritious. I thought even kids could get into growing sprouts, and maybe if they grew them they would be more inclined to eat them. All you need to grow sprouts are the seeds, a jar, and a little piece of fiberglass mesh. It's so easy and is less than a week from sprouting to eating. Bean sprouts are even easier, you can grow them in a colander or on a dish towel. Green "smoothies" are another way to get some real nutrition easily. You have to use organic produce though, once again, more expensive. All of this could easily be taught in a community center or church basement or somewhere like that.

    I was actually an unpaid intern at a 501 3 (c) institute last summer for 90 days, that's where I got my Raw Chef certification. I have also been back there several times to volunteer.

    More interesting info MM....
    Last edited by chi77; 06-21-2012 at 10:52 AM.

  2. #17
    MissMuffins's Avatar
    MissMuffins is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by chi77 View Post
    I'm a certified Raw Chef, so I can teach basic Raw Chef classes as well. Only problem is of course all of those kinds of ingredients are expensive. Can probably buy 20 lbs of those orange crunchy cheese puffs for the price of one pound of raw, organic nuts or seeds. It would be great to educate those less fortunate, who are also suffering from obesity, hypertension, etc. etc. partially due to the unavailability of fresh produce and lack of knowledge about what real food is (unfortunately that's not just true with the underprivileged). One pound of organic broccoli seeds is about $18.00 last time I checked, but you get a lot of broccoli sprouts out of that. Alfalfa seeds are cheaper and alfalfa sprouts are so nutritious. I thought even kids could get into growing sprouts, and maybe if they grew them they would be more inclined to eat them. All you need to grow sprouts are the seeds, a jar, and a little piece of fiberglass mesh. It's so easy and is less than a week from sprouting to eating. Bean sprouts are even easier, you can grow them in a colander or on a dish towel. Green "smoothies" are another way to get some real nutrition easily. You have to use organic produce though, once again, more expensive. All of this could easily be taught in a community center or church basement or somewhere like that.

    I was actually an unpaid intern at a 501 3 (c) institute last summer for 90 days, that's where I got my Raw Chef certification. I have also been back there several times to volunteer.

    More interesting info MM....
    That is so cool! Farmers markets are a good place to connect with folks who share your interests. I'm sure you're aware that there are specialties within business and accounting. You could specialize and then market yourself to those are into good, healthy food. The folks who raise organic, free range, sustainably produced, locally grown, etc. do so on varying scales. If nothing else you could probably make enough money doing their "small farm" or "small business" or "non profit" tax prep to support yourself and indulge your passion.

    The obesity epidemic in the US is so often blamed on inactivity, fast food, processed foods, HFC, etc...I have recently begun to question whether the obesity epidemic may be a truer indication of how many Americans are in poverty than the federal poverty index.

    MM
    "Our past is a story existing only in our minds. Look, analyze, understand, and forgive. Then, as quickly as possible, chuck it." ~ Marianne Williamson

  3. #18
    laurad121 is offline Senior Member
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    Years ago like you I pursued a Bachelor's agree in business. I was one of the top people in my class when I graduated. I worked for 4 years in the field and HATED it. Also, the CPA exam for accounting is a very hard test and in the NY area where I live it is crucial to have passed it. My ex is still an accountant and hates his job to this day but makes a lot of money. He can deal with that but not everyone can. I went back to school and got a second bachelors degree and a masters degree in occupational therapy. I LOVE IT. Best decision I ever made. I feel I am making a difference and my job is so rewarding. So it depends on your personality if it is matters to you to love what you do for less money or dislike what you do and make a lot of money. Good luck deciding.

  4. #19
    VenusDarkStar Guest
    Unlike the rest of you, I do not come from a background of higher education. But I'm the one with the snowballs. They're delicious on a hot Summer day and fun to play with in the Winter. Yes, I'm a salesperson. LOL

    I once read a book called, "Do What You Love....The Money Will Follow". I think the title says it all.

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