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Thread: Why are social skills considered so much more important than intellectual pursuits?

  1. #31
    gorillagirl Guest
    personality type tests only go so far because there is the self-image that we hold of ourselves that sometimes does not match with our day-to-day reality. for example, i might answer a self-test question or series of questions to affirm my, let's say, slow-to-anger and quick-to-forgive self image. in real world situations, i may be fast to anger and slow to forgive at times. there is often a disconnect between who we WANT to be and who we really are so i only put a bit of faith in the credibility of personality tests.

  2. #32
    Azureth is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissMuffins View Post
    Just out of curiosity, who administered the inventory?
    Inventory? You mean test? Because I've taken those MB tests from various websites over the years and have always gotten an ISTJ.

  3. #33
    fiorinda Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gorillagirl View Post
    personality type tests only go so far because there is the self-image that we hold of ourselves that sometimes does not match with our day-to-day reality. for example, i might answer a self-test question or series of questions to affirm my, let's say, slow-to-anger and quick-to-forgive self image. in real world situations, i may be fast to anger and slow to forgive at times. there is often a disconnect between who we WANT to be and who we really are so i only put a bit of faith in the credibility of personality tests.
    Digressing completely but possibly of interest, the Johari Windows model takes this into account - I had to do a presentation on it when I attended a 'training for trainers' course, it was really interesting!

  4. #34
    pinkunicorn's Avatar
    pinkunicorn is offline Senior Member
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    I am an ENFP.

    I had to take this for my career development class last semester. I am very close to the "middle" between the S (Sensing) and the N (Intuition), so I can really go either way, depending on my mood and the situation.

    In the class, we did talk about what GG mentioned--how reliable are the individual results. It's true that an individual can answer these questions based on how they want to be, rather than how they actually are. This is why it's important to have a competent professional administer these tests (and I stress the term competent). Not only can a professional help you figure out what to do with the results, a professional can also help decipher if these results are honest and, if not, perhaps figure out the reasoning behind the dishonesty. Such as, why would someone who is a "P" want to be a "J"? What is it about the J that the person finds appealing? Do they believe society "likes" J's better? Do the people in his/her close environment (immediate family/friends) prefer J's over P's?

    Interesting.
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    Never try to fit in when you are meant to stand out.


  5. #35
    Azureth is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkunicorn View Post
    I am an ENFP.

    I had to take this for my career development class last semester. I am very close to the "middle" between the S (Sensing) and the N (Intuition), so I can really go either way, depending on my mood and the situation.

    In the class, we did talk about what GG mentioned--how reliable are the individual results. It's true that an individual can answer these questions based on how they want to be, rather than how they actually are. This is why it's important to have a competent professional administer these tests (and I stress the term competent). Not only can a professional help you figure out what to do with the results, a professional can also help decipher if these results are honest and, if not, perhaps figure out the reasoning behind the dishonesty. Such as, why would someone who is a "P" want to be a "J"? What is it about the J that the person finds appealing? Do they believe society "likes" J's better? Do the people in his/her close environment (immediate family/friends) prefer J's over P's?

    Interesting.
    Well, I can most assure you I answer honestly on all the tests how I am.
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  6. #36
    gorillagirl Guest
    interesting news about zappos.com and their company culture- read the COMMENTS section.

    Tony Hsieh: "I Fire Those Who Don't Fit Our Company Culture" | Inc.com
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  7. #37
    MissMuffins's Avatar
    MissMuffins is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkunicorn View Post
    I am an ENFP.

    I had to take this for my career development class last semester. I am very close to the "middle" between the S (Sensing) and the N (Intuition), so I can really go either way, depending on my mood and the situation.

    In the class, we did talk about what GG mentioned--how reliable are the individual results. It's true that an individual can answer these questions based on how they want to be, rather than how they actually are. This is why it's important to have a competent professional administer these tests (and I stress the term competent). Not only can a professional help you figure out what to do with the results, a professional can also help decipher if these results are honest and, if not, perhaps figure out the reasoning behind the dishonesty. Such as, why would someone who is a "P" want to be a "J"? What is it about the J that the person finds appealing? Do they believe society "likes" J's better? Do the people in his/her close environment (immediate family/friends) prefer J's over P's?

    Interesting.
    If you didn't see what pinkunicorn posted about "competent", please allow me to direct your attention to the emphasis she placed on that particular point.

    I've had a professional administer the full-blown MBTI as part of a skills inventory twice that I can recall. I've also participated in numerous "personality type" workshops based on the MBTI (any personality type "test" that puts participants into one of 4 main groups is based on the MBTI). Many of them are franchised, packaged products and I enjoy most of them, yet I am aware that the "spin" that workshop puts on the MBTI & Jungian pyschology (which the MBTI is based upon) depends on the workshop developer's other learning, insights & experiences. Each version of it gives me a little more insight into how I work, how others work, and how we do or don't work together. I particularly like the True Colors workshop.

    I enjoy most of the "personality type" workshops, but not all. At the most notable exception, the facilitator used a questionnaire which divided us into 4 kinds of fish. It was obvious from the get-go that she was in over her head, and by the end of the workshop I wanted to slap her. She's a dear lady and as a general rule is a very good facilitator. Never in a million years would I tell her that one of her sessions was one of my worst-ever workshop/training conference experiences. (In that 3 hour session, she managed to hit almost every PTSD trigger I have. It didn't help matters that I was already very much on edge. The entire retreat was an extraordinarily negative experience for almost everyone in our breakout group.)

    I thought the "What kind of fish are you?" game had died a natural death, until I heard through the grapevine that a former coworker who's part of the same social circle had used it at a staff training a year ago. Thank the powers that be, I was the only staff member in the department who was not included in that training. I could have wound up as a bat shyt crazy fish, and that wasn't one of the 4 types in the game.

    The "fish game" was a really good example of the difference between what a MBTI formally administered by a competent professional is like, versus someone who runs a MBTI-based "personality type" workshop like the instrument is a party game.

    If the participants feel they must please the facilitator and the facilitator comes across like certain groups are "bad", more difficult, or less common, it can skew the results big-time.

    MM
    "Our past is a story existing only in our minds. Look, analyze, understand, and forgive. Then, as quickly as possible, chuck it." ~ Marianne Williamson

  8. #38
    Devyn's Avatar
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    It's not weird at all! The main thing is to just be yourself, on the job and off the job. This is easier said than done, but a good concept to keep returning to.

    I love this quote:
    "...to experience oneself honestly, not lying to oneself, and to express myself honestly, now that, my friend, is very hard to do." ~Bruce Lee

    So whatever that means for you...in other words: be yourself and don't apologize for it! It's OK!

    Sometimes it's good to interact with others too... we learn from each other right?

    But I totally agree about the job interview thing... it's so uncomfortable and phony! I usually just throw caution to the wind and be myself on interviews... it scares most of them away!
    “Someday I want to have children and give them all the love I never had.” ~Marilyn Monroe

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