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Thread: THIS age gap marriage SHOULD NOT BE HAPPENING!!!!!!!!!

  1. #16
    Sweetie28's Avatar
    Sweetie28 is offline Mark's girl
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    I really need to do a research paper on this someday because I'm fascinated with stuff like this lol. It's interesting to examine psychologically. I think these women are crazy, delusional, and maybe some are mentally ill. Scott Peterson (who killed Lacy and their unborn son) is getting married and look what a psychopath that guy is.
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  2. #17
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    I have mixed emotions about the death penalty too, Trish.

    I have the academic knowledge that people of color, people who have little or no economic means, people who have mental illness, people who have learning disabilities, etc., are prosecuted more ardently, convicted at higher rates, sentenced more severely, and incarcerated at far higher rates than white males who hail from families of economic means. When a rich white person is sent to prison, it's a country-club prison and for a much shorter period of time than a poor woman or a black man who committed a less severe offense would spend in a hellhole. That same academic knowledge also tells me how often the courts get it wrong with regard to the death penalty.

    I think about closure for the victims' families and wonder does that balance the risk of taking a life in error, in the name of justice?

    Then I weigh those things against our Constitutional provision against cruel and usual punishment. As I consider this matter from the purely academic perspective of one who has never been incarcerated and never been in a situation where I was wrongly accused, then tried, convicted and sentenced for a crime I did not commit, yet who is intimately familiar with what it's like to exist while waiting for the other shoe to drop and acutely aware of countless lost opportunities simply because people who had the so-called right and authority to determine my outcome made decisions on my behalf to further their own agenda/best interest, I wonder: Is it not somehow more inhumane to deny liberty indefinitely, forcing another to live in a crowded, disease-infested equivalent of a kennel for human beings, or in isolation, denying that person access to educational, vocational and life-skills training--not to mention the mental health care--necessary to would rehabilitate rather than merely punish, only to prolong "justice" in the name of "humanity"?

    When I think of it in those terms, it is almost as though we do things like abolish the death penalty in favor of not having the balls to make a decision and stick to it, even if it's wrong.

    And then there's what my sister said: she thinks the death penalty amounts to letting them off easy, because the most fit punishment for someone like that is to make him live in his own skin.

    I know that people who make bad choices need to experience appropriate consequences for those decisions. I also know people in power like to institutionalize people who are different, whether it's those who are poor (debtor's prisons, poor farms, orphanages), those who are mentally ill or learning disabled (asylums) or whomever (concentration camps), and in the US today "prison" in general has become just as much a means of institutionalizing people as it is an earned, appropriate consequence for intentionally making bad decisions.

    If that's "on the fence" then that's where I be!

    MM
    Last edited by MissMuffins; 11-21-2014 at 01:21 AM.
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    "Our past is a story existing only in our minds. Look, analyze, understand, and forgive. Then, as quickly as possible, chuck it." ~ Marianne Williamson

  3. #18
    christina923 is offline Senior Member
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    yup...life in the human kennel...

    Conn. death row inmate refuses to eat nonkosher food, files lawsuit - WFTX-TV Fort Myers/Naples, FL

    this ******* should be killed.... end the expense...end the "demands".

  4. #19
    legallyblonde Guest
    Since you want to kill this man^^^for filing suit, shouldn't we be afraid of you? Killing people for killing people makes no sense. Killing people for filing lawsuits is just crazy and mean.

    Ali
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  5. #20
    theREALTrish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweetie28 View Post
    I really need to do a research paper on this someday because I'm fascinated with stuff like this lol. It's interesting to examine psychologically. I think these women are crazy, delusional, and maybe some are mentally ill. Scott Peterson (who killed Lacy and their unborn son) is getting married and look what a psychopath that guy is.
    Isn't Scott Peterson on death row? If he can get a marriage license in the state of California then I guess Charles Manson, who isn't on death row, can get one, too. Oy! There needs to be some legislation done about this. Convicted felons lose their rights to vote. They should lose their rights to marry, also. I may be conflicted about the death penalty but I'm sure as heck not conflicted about people in prison being denied all the comforts and rights afforded to law-abiding citizens. Especially people convicted of murder.
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  6. #21
    theREALTrish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissMuffins View Post
    I have mixed emotions about the death penalty too, Trish.

    I have the academic knowledge that people of color, people who have little or no economic means, people who have mental illness, people who have learning disabilities, etc., are prosecuted more ardently, convicted at higher rates, sentenced more severely, and incarcerated at far higher rates than white males who hail from families of economic means. When a rich white person is sent to prison, it's a country-club prison and for a much shorter period of time than a poor woman or a black man who committed a less severe offense would spend in a hellhole. That same academic knowledge also tells me how often the courts get it wrong with regard to the death penalty.

    I think about closure for the victims' families and wonder does that balance the risk of taking a life in error, in the name of justice?

    Then I weigh those things against our Constitutional provision against cruel and usual punishment. As I consider this matter from the purely academic perspective of one who has never been incarcerated and never been in a situation where I was wrongly accused, then tried, convicted and sentenced for a crime I did not commit, yet who is intimately familiar with what it's like to exist while waiting for the other shoe to drop and acutely aware of countless lost opportunities simply because people who had the so-called right and authority to determine my outcome made decisions on my behalf to further their own agenda/best interest, I wonder: Is it not somehow more inhumane to deny liberty indefinitely, forcing another to live in a crowded, disease-infested equivalent of a kennel for human beings, or in isolation, denying that person access to educational, vocational and life-skills training--not to mention the mental health care--necessary to would rehabilitate rather than merely punish, only to prolong "justice" in the name of "humanity"?

    When I think of it in those terms, it is almost as though we do things like abolish the death penalty in favor of not having the balls to make a decision and stick to it, even if it's wrong.

    And then there's what my sister said: she thinks the death penalty amounts to letting them off easy, because the most fit punishment for someone like that is to make him live in his own skin.

    I know that people who make bad choices need to experience appropriate consequences for those decisions. I also know people in power like to institutionalize people who are different, whether it's those who are poor (debtor's prisons, poor farms, orphanages), those who are mentally ill or learning disabled (asylums) or whomever (concentration camps), and in the US today "prison" in general has become just as much a means of institutionalizing people as it is an earned, appropriate consequence for intentionally making bad decisions.

    If that's "on the fence" then that's where I be!

    MM
    I understand all your points, MM. Let me put it this way, as someone who has experienced the loss of one of the most important people ever to be in my life at the hands of someone else. The person who murdered my daughter's father was 19 or 20 at the time. That was 1991 (my daughter was four when her father was killed). The young man was sentenced to 25 years to life. He'll be eligible for parole in 2016. I guess that will make him in his mid 40's. Do I hope that he has repented for what he did? Yes. Do I think he should ever be released? No. My daughter and her sister, who now has two children of her own, will never have had the joy of their father in their life. He wasn't there to walk his oldest daughter down the aisle when she got married a couple of years ago. Those young woman have adjusted to life without their father but they will carry their loss forever. The man who caused them that pain should never be free to have any type of normal life. I think I kind of agree with your sister. Death is not the ultimate punishment. It's certainly a complicated issue, and not one I would ever wish anyone to have to face on a personal level.
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  7. #22
    SheLikesKitties's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by legallyblonde View Post
    Since you want to kill this man^^^for filing suit, shouldn't we be afraid of you? Killing people for killing people makes no sense. Killing people for filing lawsuits is just crazy and mean.

    Ali
    The man is already on death row. Christina is not asking for any additional penalties.
    You know it's love when the pain of being apart is greater than the pain of being together.

  8. #23
    SheLikesKitties's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissMuffins View Post
    I know that people who make bad choices need to experience appropriate consequences for those decisions. I also know people in power like to institutionalize people who are different, whether it's those who are poor (debtor's prisons, poor farms, orphanages), those who are mentally ill or learning disabled (asylums) or whomever (concentration camps), and in the US today "prison" in general has become just as much a means of institutionalizing people as it is an earned, appropriate consequence for intentionally making bad decisions.

    If that's "on the fence" then that's where I be!

    MM
    About the mentally ill. Some people are not fit to be let loose in society. My husband worked in a mental hospital for the criminally insane. Some of the crimes those lunatics commited were just horrible. The mentally ill and some handicapped people often do not have anyone willing to be responsible for their care, thus they are institutionalized, ditto with the elderly.
    You know it's love when the pain of being apart is greater than the pain of being together.

  9. #24
    Ashley20 is offline Member
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    .she's just another 'attention *****'.so common these days.*yawns*..i mean who really thinks this lame brain nut job would want to be involved with an 80 year old guy if he wasn't rich or famous?? cw isn't rich but his name is infamaus .... i mean really?..the less attention for people like this ,the better..they feed off the attention.every time you hear about this stuff,just remember the victims and don't even pay attention to the nut jobs,,,that way they wither away.there are things worse then death,and for some people that would be being inconsuqentaul.
    legallyblonde likes this.
    "Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views."
    William F. Buckley, Jr.....

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