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Thread: white blood count & low thyroid?

  1. #1
    vegasgirls702 is offline vegasgirls702
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    white blood count & low thyroid?

    I just talked with my doctor who said that my blood work came back odd.
    He said my white blood cells were at 14 and that my thyroid was low & that he wants me to come back in so he can check my throat and re take the blood tests. can anyone tell me what this means? I have been trying to read online and I get alot of different information.

  2. #2
    greeneyedgirl's Avatar
    greeneyedgirl is offline Senior Member
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    Girl, you gotta ask these questions while he's in your face! lol

    but ya know, you can always call the doc's office and tell them, "i don't understand what the doc told me, can i speak to a nurse who can explain please?"

    and until then, i looked up and found some links for ya. sounds like you have some sort of infection, to me.

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/low...-count/AN00726
    http://www.womentowomen.com/hypothyr...ds=low+thyroid


    Let us know hun!

    Tracy
    ~Stupid people shouldn't breathe~

    ~Denial is the first step toward recovery~

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  3. #3
    Angel's Avatar
    Angel is offline Anger Thrives In A Fool
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    Well I'm not sure what you mean by thyroid being low. Did you mean the thyroid function is extremely low (meaning hypo) or the thyroid number is very low (meaning hyper)?

    I have Hashimoto's Disease, which is a form of Hypothyroidism. I was diagnosed at 22 (very young age for this disease) with a blood test that looks for it's antibodies. I also have a goitre from the disease so I must see an Endocrinologist every 6 months and have an ultrasound done every 2 years to monitor the disease.

    On the other side of the spectrum for the thyroid is Hyperthyroidsim and generally is caused by Grave's Disease.

    Thyroid disease affects everyone differently, especially depending on which side of the spectrum they fall.

    Low WBC. Hmm, that can be related to an autoimmune disease. I wonder if Grave's can have the same affect?

    I had a low blood count during my pregnancy (I'm pretty sure it was the White blood #) that was related to the UTI (or possibly the antibiotics?) I had. My doctor told me it was normal because of the infection.

    I hope this will at least get you started about the thyroid part. If you know what the numbers are and depending on the test they did I may be able tell you if you're falling in the hypo/hyper side. The test result you'd be looking for would be either T3, T4, and/or TSH.

    Keep us posted! Honestly I've had these number go pretty batty but I remember the first time I heard something's wrong. Freaked me out. Just take a deep breath and try to relax.

    When's your next appointment to discuss the numbers?
    Last edited by Angel; 05-31-2007 at 03:55 PM.
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  4. #4
    vegasgirls702 is offline vegasgirls702
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    Well he asked me to come back on Monday 4th, and he wants to check my throat, about 2 years ago I was sent to a endocronologist (sp) and they found something in my throat and I was told to come back in 6 months (which I never did, insurance reasons).
    My doctor did tell me that my metabolism might be slow also, so maybe my throid is hypothyroidism? Can you tell me what you know about hashimotos disease? I have read on that when I was trying to figure out why I had lost alot, alot, of hair also my period just slowed completly down, I barely have one but it shows every month, just enough to let me know its there. Sorry if that was TMI
    Thank you!!!

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    Angel's Avatar
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    Ha-ha! Not TMI.

    The only two things I could think of when wanting to check your throat is:
    • The thyroid has a goiter (which is basically a defomity from the disease attacking it)
    • Nodules. Which could require a biopsy or treatment (Not sure what they do other than Iodine/Radiation).


    Hair loss, mimicked depression, supressed period. Have had all of them and more. The hair loss has something to do with the way your hair produces more growth and breaks down what it needs for it. If you thyroid is being exhausted taking care of the basics (breathing, heartrate, metabolism, kinda stuff) it puts other things on the back burner that aren't as important, like hair growth, hormone production, etc.

    A slow metabolism is most definitely the main symptom of HYPO-thyroidism. Since I don't have really any exposure to Hyperthyroidism I can't say too much.

    Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. I believe it is genetic since my mother was diagnosed after me at the insistance of my Endocronologist. Which is really quite sad as she suffered for years with it and it took my diagnosis for someone to bother looking.

    What they believe happened is when I was pregnant my body changed like it should have to accomodate the baby. After you have the baby it is quite normal for a woman to develop short-term thyroid issues while the body is reverting back to it's pre-pregnancy state. For some women, though, the body mixes up the signal and the body is convinced the thyroid is an intruder and will begin making antibodies to attack it. These antibodies attack the thyroid and the thyroid begins to look deformed (aka Goiter, pronounced Goy-ter). The thyroid should look like a butterfly. Mine looks like a pretty freaky butterfly (it's lumpy and deformed in parts, lol).

    Here's a good example of what I meant Normal vs. Goiter

    There are some people who develop tumors on the thyroid, but it is generally seen with Grave's Disease from my understanding and rarely a big concern like other types of tumors.

    Sounds like your doctor is just making sure he/she knows exactly what he's detecting. It's important you follow up and let them rule things out. Following up at the doctor every 6 months is common for me. He checks my goiter to make sure it doesn't suddenly have a big growth spurt (which would indicate a tumor or a way undertreated thyroid. And by way undertreated we're talking 3rd world country care. Most people here will never have a goiter that big!)

    Here's a picture of what the typical goiter can look like. Weight and general neck structure (thin neck, thin build) can make the goiter appear to be larger than what it truly is. Picture of Goiter Mine is smaller than that picture and considered significant to my doctor so as you can see we're not talking anything insane like you'd find if you googled goiter. That should give you a relative understanding of what we're talking about.

    The thyroid is a wonderous organ in our body but when it malfunctions it can really make you feel like crap. And getting it back under control can take years. For me the hardest thing to accept is just how long it took to start feeling better. 6 months. From the time my thyroid is back in the normal range (not when I started the medicine but 6 months after the medicine was right). And every change since then takes time. There is no overnight feel better method unfortunately.

    I had a lot of hair loss too. To the point I had small bald patches!

    I started taking Evening Primrose Oil in addition to my medicine because of reading this:
    . . . evening primrose oil (also known as EPO) is a nutritional supplement that is frequently mentioned. In his book, "Solved: The Riddle of Illness," Stephen Langer, M.D. points to the fact that symptoms of essential fatty acid insufficiency are very similar to hypothyroidism, and recommends evening primrose oil -- an excellent source of essential fatty acids -- as helpful for people with hypothyroidism. The usefulness of evening primrose oil, particularly in dealing with the issues of excess hair loss with hypothyroidism, was also reinforced by endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard. According to Dr. Blanchard:

    "For hair loss, I routinely recommend multiple vitamins, and especially evening primrose oil. If there's any sex pattern to it -- if a woman is losing hair in partly a male pattern - -then, the problem is there is excessive conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone at the level of the hair follicle. Evening primrose oil is an inhibitor of that conversion. So almost anybody with hair loss probably will benefit from evening primrose oil."

    As someone who has had a few periods of extensive hair loss since I became hypothyroid, I can vouch for the fact that taking EPO was the only thing that calmed it down. It not only slowed, then stopped my hair loss over about two months, but new hair grew back, and my hair was no longer straw-like, dry and easily knotted.
    I don't know how much it helps but I did notice a similiar effect as to the one she vouches for. Who knows where the effect comes from sometimes though, ya know?

    But desperate women will try anything once! And it's working so I'm sticking to it!

    Also - if you have Hypothyroidism it depletes your calcium. The medicine they treat it with depletes the calcium further. Always take a calcium supplement.

    Let me know once you find out.

    And here's a couple more links on Hypothyroid that I've used in the past:

    http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hairloss/a/hairloss_2.htm
    http://www.thyroid.org/

    Excellent books:

    Living-Well-Hypothyroidism-Doctor-Revised
    Thyroid-Solution-Mind-Body-Depression-Regaining

    I've read both and highly recommend them. One of the authors, Mary Shomon has a lot of info at her site you may want to check out.

    Most people with thyroid disease fight for years for appropriate care. An outstanding Endocrinologist is the most important aspect. Patient understanding is the second. Get educated. If you have a thyroid disease it is lifelong and can dramatically effect your quality of life if improperly treated.
    Last edited by Angel; 05-31-2007 at 10:37 PM.
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  6. #6
    agula_jonson Guest

    slightly low blood count

    Hi bro, My mother just turned forty, is anemic, and has an under active thyroid. She recently ceased taking birth control, and has had some issues with her thyroid. Thankfully, though, though she was originally believed to have a thyroid tumor, the results indicated this was not so. However, she went to her endocrinologist today and found that her white blood cell count is slightly low, maybe by a few points. Her doctor wants her to see a hematologist, though. What could be wrong with her? Is this condition something serious?

  7. #7
    Angel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agula_jonson View Post
    Hi bro, My mother just turned forty, is anemic, and has an under active thyroid. She recently ceased taking birth control, and has had some issues with her thyroid. Thankfully, though, though she was originally believed to have a thyroid tumor, the results indicated this was not so. However, she went to her endocrinologist today and found that her white blood cell count is slightly low, maybe by a few points. Her doctor wants her to see a hematologist, though. What could be wrong with her? Is this condition something serious?
    Thyroid disease can be a serious disease but not in the same way one would feel if say their heart wasn't functioning properly. For most people good care through an Endocrinologist and medicine can allieviate most of the common problems.

    Sounds like the doctor is more concerned about her anemia than her thyroid right now.

    No clue what's going on with her, but I can tell you having the thyroid checked for tumors is pretty common. I've had mine checked and my mother and sister have had theirs checked. My mother and I both were diagnosed with Hashimoto's Disease. My sister is currently in the process being diagnosed (but I'm willing to bet she'll have the same as us).

    I don't hear about tumors on the underactive side as much as I do on the overactive side. Not sure why though.

    Best wishes that your mom is feeling better soon!
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